“GOM” Landscapes and Waterscapes of High Ground, Mid Ground, Low Ground, and No Ground on the Coastal Counties of the Gulf of Mexico.

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Saturday, August 6, 2016 to Saturday, October 1, 2016
Contemporary Arts Center
900 Camp Street
New Orleans, LA


“GOM”
LANDSCAPES AND WATERSCAPES
OF HIGHGROUND, MIDGROUND,
LOWGROUND, AND NOGROUND ON
THE COASTAL COUNTIES OF THE
GULF OF MEXICO.

IF SEA LEVEL RISE IS 10 METERS OR
MORE IN 500 YEARS,THEN MIGRATION
AWAY FROM LOWGROUND AREAS OF
COASTAL COUNTIES OF THE GULF OF
MEXICO STATES WILL BE REQUIRED,
AND WILL HAVE ALREADY BEGUN.


Near the end of the summer of 2015, I began an internship as a graphic designer and digital artist at the Creative Alliance of New Orleans.  It was there that I met Robert Tannen.  After seeing my work he asked if I would be interested in collaborating on a project.  The concept was to use current physical maps of Gulf of Mexico counties and data to create vectorized digital illustrations that specifically illustrate the levels of elevation within each county or parish bordering the Gulf of Mexico.  I began by taking high-resolution photographs of the large physical maps and then digitally rendering them using Adobe software.  

Since the start of the collaboration, my fascination for the subject has grown tremendously, and I look forward to future projects. The technique that I used to design the resulting 68 maps involved a meticulous process, which not only helped me gain a greater bird's eye view of the entire gulf coast but helped me hone a greater appreciation for topography and map-making as well.


A further description by Robert Tannen,

"In 2015 I was afforded the opportunity by the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation to join a multi-disciplinary group of creative people for a residency on Captiva Island, a barrier island in Lee County Florida. This enabled me to execute an idea I have been working on to illustrate the relative land elevations within coastal counties of the Gulf of Mexico and implications of climate change and sea level rise. I had been studying all 68 coastal counties on the Gulf of Mexico. At Captiva I was able, with support from graphic artist Mathew Foreman in New Orleans, Ann Brady and Rauschenberg Residency staff, and artist/resident James Weingrod, to create map prints showing areas within these coastal counties that reveal communities that may be lost. Artist Carly Neel, a native Floridian now living in New Orleans has also portrayed the relative land elevations in 3D models.
At Captiva I was also able to make several large drawings of the subject that possibly comprise one of the largest land-water scapes. Thank you to Andrea Andersson for including this work and environmental warning in the CAC's open call show presented during the center's 40th year."

for more details about the event visit Contemporary Art Center New Orleans